Illustration by Johanna Lindsholm

Fiction Awards

k. Margaret Grossman
Fiction Awards

  • First Prize
    $1000
  • Second Prize
    $300
  • Third Prize
    $200

Contest Guidelines

  1. Send unpublished stories, 10,000 words max. All subjects and styles welcome.
  2. Postmark by January 15th.
  3. Name, Address, Telephone Number, Email Address (optional) — on Cover Page only.
  4. If by regular “snail mail” post: include Self Addressed Stamped Envelope or email address for reply.
  5. Include $10 Reading Fee per story — OR —
    $15 Reading Fee for two stories.
  6. All entries considered for publication.

All currency above given in US dollars.

We are now accepting online submissions via Submittable!  Click the button below to visit our Submittable page.

Online Submissions – Click Below

Snail-Mail Submissions:  Reading fees — by check or money order — should be made out to Literal Latté and included with your entry manuscript.) Mail to:

Literal Latté Awards

200 East 10th Street, Suite 240
New York, NY 10003
(212) 260-5532

Contact Us

Literal Latte Fiction Award Winners

Please note that this listing may be incomplete.

Winter 2017 Issue

Nothing to Declare By Edward Hamlin

Second Prize, 2017 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
The old farm pond lay just beyond the electric gate with its invisible eye and whispering hydraulics. “Stop,” said Perry from the rear seat, “I need a moment here.” […]

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Winter 2017 Issue

Out of Order By Jennifer Perrine

First Prize, 2017 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
When Toby finished living his life for the second time, he was met with a blinding light. Had he known that this was the end, that he was waking now, reentering the world, he might have assumed the light was heaven, or death…

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Winter 2017 Issue

The Dark By Lauren Lynn Matheny

Third Prize, 2017 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
My brother slept with his backpack on. Every night, before he got in bed, he would follow my orders like a grunt at boot camp: pajamas on, teeth brushed, hair combed, face washed. I’d call him away from whatever he was reading (that year, it was always something about bugs; huge encyclopedic collections with pictures of larvae….

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Fall 2016 Issue

My Little Cuckoos By Christopher Allen

Third Prize, 2016 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
I told her. Dozens of times. The Big House, as we called it, was a mountain of clutter — too much for a widow with vertigo. A few years ago Dad ended in a heap at the bottom of the staircase. Mom, serving lunch at the mission, didn’t find his body for hours….

Posted in Fiction | Tagged , | 11 Responses
Fall 2016 Issue

Home By Julia Salinger

First Prize, 2016 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
“Anna,” my lover says, “Why do you never talk about your family?” I am curled around her back. The delicate bones of her shoulder blades make indentations in my breasts. Her voice is clouded by sleep and blurring around the edges….

Posted in Fiction | Tagged , | 5 Responses
Fall 2016 Issue

Demeter in Kansas By Kate Duva

Second Prize, 2016 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
The key to her sultriness was her slowness, and the key to her slowness was her sadness — but when she was Lucinda la Miel, she forgot about all that. She gazed at the men in her audience as if…

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Winter 2015 Issue

Coma By Tiffany Nelson

First Prize, 2015 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
It was a silly accident, really. They were idling at a four-way stop. Mark was preoccupied, his brain grappling for the fastest route to Auntie Donna’s house. They were already late. It had been three years since their last visit, and all the once-familiar streets were now littered with subdivisions full of crescents and cul-de-sacs….

Posted in Fiction | Tagged , | 9 Responses
Winter 2015 Issue

Out of the Blue By Colin Brezicki

Second Prize, 2015 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
I learned of the mortal health risks in reading Shakespeare from my star pupil, Henry Sprague III. You could say Henry made an impact, though the irony might offend. It doesn’t take much to offend these days, and nothing does it like the truth…

Posted in Fiction | Tagged , | 7 Responses
Fall 2014 Issue

The Book of Fishing By Mark Holden

Third Prize, 2014 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
1961: The river ran cold and clear, alive with minnows. He waded in until the water reached his knees. Above him, the sun. Around him, the minnows: churning, flashing, crashing into his legs and bouncing off, each with barely the force of a fly. Yet there were hundreds, thousands, of jittery fish passing him wave after wave until white-crowned, gray-bellied clouds shrouded the sun and stole its power, and stole whatever had made the fish a moment ago vital….

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Fall 2014 Issue

Affection By Shannon Sweetnam

Second Prize, 2014 Literal Latte Fiction Award.
They moved into the squat brick Georgian in June. They bought trash cans and cleaning supplies, a plastic patio table and chair set, a shiny red front-propelled rear-bag lawn mower, three combination carbon monoxide detector fire alarms, two fire extinguishers, a fold-up escape ladder, a battery-operated weather radio, a gas grill, and — just in case — a wooden baseball bat Jake planned on keeping under the bed…

Posted in Fiction | Tagged , | 2 Responses

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